The more I learn about hep C, the more confident I am.

For genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C (hep C), taken with or without ribavirin

Actual VIEKIRA Patient

We can help you sort through the facts.

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Chronic hep C is a long-term condition caused by a virus, which is spread through blood–blood contact.

Image showing 2.7 million people in the United States are infected with chronic hep C.

About 2.7 million people in the United States are infected with chronic hep C.

Image indicating about 74%

A genotype is a genetic strain of a virus like hep C. About 74% of people in the United States with hep C have genotype 1. Before determining your treatment options, your doctor will determine your genotype with a blood test.

Do you have questions about hep C?

If you are trying to understand your condition better, we can get you started. Click the questions below to learn more about your condition and how it can impact your health and the health of others.

  • What is hepatitis C?

    Hepatitis C is a viral infection that can lead to liver disease. While some people are able to clear the virus without treatment, others develop an ongoing infection. This chronic infection can lead to liver damage.

    Hepatitis C spreads through blood. Most of the time, it does not go away without treatment, and can lead to liver damage over time. Many patients can be effectively treated; there is no vaccine available to prevent infection.

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  • About hep C genotypes

    Hepatitis C includes several distinct genotypes, or genetic strains of the virus. Your doctor will take your viral genotype into consideration when deciding what treatment to offer you, the dosage of your medications, and how long the treatment will last.

    There are at least six known genotypes and more than 50 subtypes of hepatitis C. In the United States, genotype 1 is most common.

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  • Lifestyle choices for living well with hep C

    If you have chronic hepatitis C, you may have to make a few lifestyle changes to stay as healthy as possible. It’s important to discuss the following with your doctor:

    • Reducing or stopping alcohol intake
    • Eating a healthy diet
    • Giving up cigarette smoking

    You may also want to talk to your doctor about:

    • The genetic makeup of your hep C virus
    • Treating your hepatitis C and treatment options
    • Testing for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and HIV
    • Vaccinating against hepatitis A or B

    Living with hepatitis C can be challenging, and you may find it helpful to talk with others. Family, friends, support groups, and mental health professionals can all provide support. If you have hepatitis C, do not be afraid to seek the help you need.

    Close See more
  • What is hepatitis C?

    Hepatitis C is a viral infection that can lead to liver disease. While some people are able to clear the virus without treatment, others develop an ongoing infection. This chronic infection can lead to liver damage.

    Hepatitis C spreads through blood. Most of the time, it does not go away without treatment, and can lead to liver damage over time. Many patients can be effectively treated; there is no vaccine available to prevent infection.

    Close See more
  • About hep C genotypes

    Hepatitis C includes several distinct genotypes, or genetic strains of the virus. Your doctor will take your viral genotype into consideration when deciding what treatment to offer you, the dosage of your medications, and how long the treatment will last.

    There are at least six known genotypes and more than 50 subtypes of hepatitis C. In the United States, genotype 1 is most common.

    Close See more
  • Lifestyle choices for living well with hep C

    If you have chronic hepatitis C, you may have to make a few lifestyle changes to stay as healthy as possible. It’s important to discuss the following with your doctor:

    • Reducing or stopping alcohol intake
    • Eating a healthy diet
    • Giving up cigarette smoking

    You may also want to talk to your doctor about:

    • The genetic makeup of your hep C virus
    • Treating your hepatitis C and treatment options
    • Testing for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and HIV
    • Vaccinating against hepatitis A or B

    Living with hepatitis C can be challenging, and you may find it helpful to talk with others. Family, friends, support groups, and mental health professionals can all provide support. If you have hepatitis C, do not be afraid to seek the help you need.

    Close See more
  • Cirrhosis of the liver

    Chronic hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, or scarring, of the liver. Anything that harms the liver can cause cirrhosis, which is commonly associated with alcohol abuse. Progression of cirrhosis can be so slow that people feel no symptoms for years, until liver damage has begun to take place.

    In patients with cirrhosis, scar tissue replaces healthy tissue. Many people with hepatitis C never see their disease progress to cirrhosis—approximately 5% to 20% of people will develop cirrhosis as a result of their hepatitis C infection.

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  • What are the symptoms of hep C?

    Hepatitis C can be a silent disease, meaning that people can have it but not have noticeable symptoms. This means that many people with hepatitis C don’t know they have it and therefore don’t seek treatment. During this time, the infected person can spread the virus to others.

    • Approximately 70%–80% of people with acute hepatitis C do not have any symptoms. Some people, however, can have mild to severe symptoms soon after being infected
    • Most people with chronic hepatitis C do not have any symptoms. However, if a person has been infected for many years, his or her liver may be damaged. In many cases, there are no symptoms of the disease until the disease has progressed.

    Symptoms of both acute and chronic hepatitis C may include:

    • Fever
    • Fatigue (feeling tired even if you’ve had a normal amount of rest and activity)
    • Loss of appetite
    • Nausea (upset stomach)
    • Vomiting
    • Abdominal pain (pain in the gut)
    • Dark urine
    • Gray-colored stools
    • Joint pain
    • Jaundice (yellow coloring of the eyes or skin)

    These same symptoms may appear as the disease progresses, along with these additional symptoms:

    • Weakness
    • Weight loss
    • Breast enlargement in men
    • A rash on the palms
    • Difficulty with blood clotting
    • Spiderlike blood vessels on the skin
    Close See more
  • Acute/short-term vs chronic hep C

    Hepatitis C can be divided into acute—in other words short-term, or chronic—in other words long-term, infection. Acute refers to the time immediately after exposure to the virus and lasting less than 6 months. Chronic is defined as ongoing infection lasting more than 6 months.

    Only 15% to 25% of people infected with hepatitis C are able to clear the virus during the initial 6-month period. The other patients develop chronic hepatitis C, which can be lifelong.

    Symptoms of serious liver disease include:

    • Weakness
    • Loss of appetite
    • Weight loss
    • Breast enlargement in men
    • A rash on the palms
    • Difficulty with blood clotting
    • Spiderlike blood vessels on the skin

    When hepatitis C advances to cirrhosis, the liver begins to fail and can no longer remove toxic substances from the blood. The stomach can fill with fluid, and the kidneys and spleen may become involved, which can result in anemia or bleeding issues.

    In people with advanced cirrhosis, the liver can no longer get rid of waste, and the eyes and skin may become yellow, a condition called jaundice.

    If the liver disease reaches the point that the liver can no longer function, the patient develops liver failure, which can cause a coma and even death.

    Close See more
  • Cirrhosis of the liver

    Chronic hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, or scarring, of the liver. Anything that harms the liver can cause cirrhosis, which is commonly associated with alcohol abuse. Progression of cirrhosis can be so slow that people feel no symptoms for years, until liver damage has begun to take place.

    In patients with cirrhosis, scar tissue replaces healthy tissue. Many people with hepatitis C never see their disease progress to cirrhosis—approximately 5% to 20% of people will develop cirrhosis as a result of their hepatitis C infection.

    Close See more
  • What are the symptoms of hep C?

    Hepatitis C can be a silent disease, meaning that people can have it but not have noticeable symptoms. This means that many people with hepatitis C don’t know they have it and therefore don’t seek treatment. During this time, the infected person can spread the virus to others.

    • Approximately 70%–80% of people with acute hepatitis C do not have any symptoms. Some people, however, can have mild to severe symptoms soon after being infected
    • Most people with chronic hepatitis C do not have any symptoms. However, if a person has been infected for many years, his or her liver may be damaged. In many cases, there are no symptoms of the disease until the disease has progressed.

    Symptoms of both acute and chronic hepatitis C may include:

    • Fever
    • Fatigue (feeling tired even if you’ve had a normal amount of rest and activity)
    • Loss of appetite
    • Nausea (upset stomach)
    • Vomiting
    • Abdominal pain (pain in the gut)
    • Dark urine
    • Gray-colored stools
    • Joint pain
    • Jaundice (yellow coloring of the eyes or skin)

    These same symptoms may appear as the disease progresses, along with these additional symptoms:

    • Weakness
    • Weight loss
    • Breast enlargement in men
    • A rash on the palms
    • Difficulty with blood clotting
    • Spiderlike blood vessels on the skin
    Close See more
  • Acute/short-term vs chronic hep C

    Hepatitis C can be divided into acute—in other words short-term, or chronic—in other words long-term, infection. Acute refers to the time immediately after exposure to the virus and lasting less than 6 months. Chronic is defined as ongoing infection lasting more than 6 months.

    Only 15% to 25% of people infected with hepatitis C are able to clear the virus during the initial 6-month period. The other patients develop chronic hepatitis C, which can be lifelong.

    Symptoms of serious liver disease include:

    • Weakness
    • Loss of appetite
    • Weight loss
    • Breast enlargement in men
    • A rash on the palms
    • Difficulty with blood clotting
    • Spiderlike blood vessels on the skin

    When hepatitis C advances to cirrhosis, the liver begins to fail and can no longer remove toxic substances from the blood. The stomach can fill with fluid, and the kidneys and spleen may become involved, which can result in anemia or bleeding issues.

    In people with advanced cirrhosis, the liver can no longer get rid of waste, and the eyes and skin may become yellow, a condition called jaundice.

    If the liver disease reaches the point that the liver can no longer function, the patient develops liver failure, which can cause a coma and even death.

    Close See more
  • Spreading hep C through shared personal items

    Personal items, such as razors or toothbrushes that come in contact with the blood of a person with hepatitis C, carry the risk of spreading the infection. While spreading hepatitis C through these items is possible, it is less common.

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis C isn’t spread by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more
  • Spreading hep C through sex

    Though it’s rare, you can get hep C through sexual contact. Research shows that the risk of getting hep C is higher among people who have multiple partners, people infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and people who have sexually transmitted diseases (STD).

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis C isn’t spread by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more
  • How hep C is spread

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected.

    Transmission of hepatitis C isn’t caused by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more
  • Spreading hep C through shared personal items

    Personal items, such as razors or toothbrushes that come in contact with the blood of a person with hepatitis C, carry the risk of spreading the infection. While spreading hepatitis C through these items is possible, it is less common.

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis C isn’t spread by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more
  • Spreading hep C through sex

    Though it’s rare, you can get hep C through sexual contact. Research shows that the risk of getting hep C is higher among people who have multiple partners, people infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and people who have sexually transmitted diseases (STD).

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis C isn’t spread by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more
  • How hep C is spread

    Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that spreads when blood from a person infected with the hepatitis C virus comes into contact with the blood of someone who is not infected.

    Transmission of hepatitis C isn’t caused by sharing knives, forks, or spoons; breastfeeding; hugging, kissing, or holding hands; or coughing or sneezing. It does not spread through food or water, or by sitting on toilet seats.

    Most people get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

    People who are at risk of getting hepatitis C include:

    • Anyone who has shared needles
    • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992
    • People who are on some forms of kidney dialysis
    • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments
    • People infected with HIV
    • Anyone who is in jail or prison
    • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C
    • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987

    Additionally, you may be at risk of hepatitis C infection if you:

    • Have had a sexual relationship with a partner who has hepatitis C
    • Share personal items, including razors or toothbrushes, with someone who has hepatitis C
    • Use intranasal drugs
    • Are a healthcare worker who has been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle
    Close See more

How VIEKIRA works

Learn how VIEKIRA prevents the hep C virus from multiplying.

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Your safety is important to us. Learn about our Important Safety Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

When taking VIEKIRA XR in combination with ribavirin, you should read the Medication Guide that comes with ribavirin, especially the important pregnancy information.

What is the most important information I should know about VIEKIRA XR?

VIEKIRA XR can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Hepatitis B virus reactivation: Before starting treatment with VIEKIRA XR, your doctor will do blood tests to check for hepatitis B virus infection. If you have ever had hepatitis B virus infection, the hepatitis B virus could become active again during or after treatment of hepatitis C virus with VIEKIRA XR. Hepatitis B virus becoming active again (called reactivation) may cause serious liver problems including liver failure and death. Your doctor will monitor you if you are at risk for hepatitis B virus reactivation during treatment and after you stop taking VIEKIRA XR.
  • VIEKIRA XR may cause severe liver problems, especially in people with certain types of cirrhosis. These severe liver problems can lead to the need for a liver transplant, or can lead to death.
  • VIEKIRA XR can cause increases in your liver function blood test results, especially if you use ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines (such as some birth control products).
    • You must stop using ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines (combination birth control pills or patches, such as Lo Loestrin® FE, Norinyl®, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo®, Ortho Evra®; hormonal vaginal rings such as NuvaRing®; and the hormone replacement therapy medicine, Fem HRT®) before you start treatment with VIEKIRA XR. If you use these medicines as a method of birth control, you must use another method during treatment with VIEKIRA XR, and for about 2 weeks after you finish treatment with VIEKIRA XR. Your doctor will tell you when you may begin taking ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines.
  • Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver function during the first 4 weeks of treatment and then as needed.
  • Your doctor may tell you to stop taking VIEKIRA XR if you develop signs or symptoms of liver problems. Tell your doctor right away if you develop any of the following symptoms, or if they worsen during treatment with VIEKIRA XR: tiredness, weakness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, yellowing of the skin or eyes, color changes in stools, confusion, or swelling of the stomach area.

Do not take VIEKIRA XR if you:

  • have certain liver problems
  • take any of the following medicines: alfuzosin hydrochloride (Uroxatral®) • atorvastatin (Caduet®, Lipitor®, Liptruzet™) • carbamazepine (Carbatrol®, Epitol®, Equetro®, Tegretol®, TEGRETOL®-XR, TERIL®) • cisapride (Propulsid®) • colchicine (Colcrys®), in patients who have certain kidney or liver problems • dronedarone (Multaq®) • efavirenz (Atripla®, Sustiva®) • ergot-containing medicines, including ergotamine tartrate (Cafergot®, Ergomar®, Ergostat®, Medihaler®, Migergot®, Wigraine®, Wigrettes®), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E. 45®, Migranal®), methylergonovine (Ergotrate®, Methergine®) • ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines • everolimus (Afinitor®, Zortress®) • gemfibrozil (Lopid®) • lovastatin (Advicor®, Altoprev®, Mevacor®) • lurasidone (Latuda®) • midazolam (when taken by mouth) • phenytoin (Dilantin®, Phenytek®) • phenobarbital (Luminal®) • pimozide (Orap®) • ranolazine (Ranexa®) • rifampin (Rifadin®, Rifamate®, Rifater®, Rimactane®) • sildenafil citrate (Revatio®), when taken for pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) • simvastatin (Simcor®, Vytorin®, Zocor®) • sirolimus (Rapamune®) • St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) or a product that contains St. John’s wort • tacrolimus (Astagraf XL®, Envarsus XR®, Prograf®) • triazolam (Halcion®)
  • have had a severe skin rash after taking ritonavir (Norvir®)

What should I tell my doctor before taking VIEKIRA XR?

  • If you have ever had hepatitis B virus infection, liver problems other than hep C infection, HIV infection, or any other medical conditions.
  • If you have had a liver transplant. If you take the medicine cyclosporine (Gengraf®, Neoral®, Sandimmune®), your doctor should check your blood levels and, if needed, may change your dose of this medicine or how often you take it, both during and after treatment with VIEKIRA XR.
  • If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if VIEKIRA XR will harm your unborn baby or pass into your breast milk. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take VIEKIRA XR.
  • About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines interact with VIEKIRA XR.
    • Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your doctor. Your doctor can tell you if it is safe to take VIEKIRA XR with other medicines.
    • When you are finished with VIEKIRA XR, ask your doctor what to do if you had a change in dose or stopped one of your usual medicines during VIEKIRA XR treatment.

What are the common side effects of VIEKIRA XR?

  • For VIEKIRA XR used with ribavirin, side effects include tiredness, nausea, itching, skin reactions such as redness or rash, sleep problems, and feeling weak.
  • For VIEKIRA XR used without ribavirin, side effects include nausea, itching, and sleep problems.

These are not all of the possible side effects of VIEKIRA XR. Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

This is the most important information to know about VIEKIRA XR. For more information, talk to your doctor or healthcare provider.


USE

VIEKIRA XR (dasabuvir, ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and ritonavir) extended-release tablets are a prescription medicine used with or without ribavirin to treat adults with genotype 1 chronic (lasting a long time) hepatitis C (hep C) virus infection.

VIEKIRA XR can be used in people who have compensated cirrhosis.

VIEKIRA XR is not for people with advanced cirrhosis (decompensated). If you have cirrhosis, talk to your doctor before taking VIEKIRA XR.


You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including the Medication Guide.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.




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